Part I, Chapter 4

  1. According to which saint, if grace is life eternal, then it must not only lead to that life, but already contain it in itself?
  2. What does the philosopher Seneca say about external treasures?
  3. What is the prerogative of grace?
  4. There is a far greater distance between grace and earthly things than between what?
  5. What do we allow ourselves to be misled by?
  6. Only a few, mindful of what, are able to despise the lust and desires of their inborn nature and, as a peasant suddenly made king, are ashamed of the character, pleasures and ways of their previous low conditions.
  7. St. Paul exhorts us to find pleasure in what?
  8. If we must desire anything on earth, let us desire what and why?

2 thoughts on “Part I, Chapter 4

  1. 1. St. Paul, 2. Seneca said that external treasures do not touch the nature of men; and though they dazzle the eye by their great splendor, they improve him neither in health nor in the form of his body, and least of all in the qualities of his mind, 3. The prerogative of grace is to raise its possessor to its own exalted position; it penetrates the soul, the true interior man, and unites itself so closely to the soul that it communicates to all its own prerogatives, 4. the sun and earth, 5. external appearances, 6. mindful of the high condition and dignity they have received by grace, 7. only in things that are above, not the things that are on earth, 8. Let us desire crosses. For in this way we shall crucify ourselves to nature and to the world, and thus we shall show that we belong to another, higher world.

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  2. 1. St. Paul says “The wages of sin is death. But the grace of God, life everlasting.” 2. Seneca, an old philosopher says, “place me in a rich house that abounds with gold and silver; I shall not admire myself; for though they are with me, they are not within me. External treasures dazzle the eye, improve him in heath of body or qualities of his mind.”
    3.The prerogative of grace; it raises its possessor to its own exalted position; it penetrates the soul, the true interior man, and unites itself so closely to the soul that it communicates to all its own prerogatives. 4. There is a far greater distance between grace and earthly things than between the sun and this earth. 5. We allow ourselves, like very stupid people, to be misled by external appearances. 6. Only a few, mindful of the high condition and dignity they have received by grace, despise the lust and desires of their inborn nature and, as a peasant suddenly made king, are ashamed of the character, pleasures and ways of their previous low conditions. 7. St. Paul exhorts us to find pleasure only in things that are above, not the things that are on earth. 8. If we must desire anything on earth, les us desire crosses.

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